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Grantmaker Profiles

How well do you know your grantmaking peers in the region? In this section we profile a number of our Member grantmakers in an attempt to learn more about their experiences as a grantmaker as well as some more personal fun stuff! Click on a grantmaker's profile below for more detailed information.

Jama Dodson
St. Louis Mental Health Board
Jenny Hoelzer
William T. Kemper Foundation
John Fort
Fort Family Foundation

Michael Howard
YouthBridge Community Foundation
Debbie Marshall
PNC Financial Services, Inc.
David Stiffler
Equifax

Kathy Reeves
Enterprise Holdings, Inc.

Wendy Jaffe
Trio Foundation of St. Louis
Cynthia Crim
Commerce Bank

Deborah J. Patterson
Monsanto Fund

JoAnn Hejna
The Saigh Foundation

Debbie Schirmer
Maritz

Sarah Kramer
Peabody

Melinda McAliney
Lutheran Foundation of St. Louis
Jama Dodson
Executive Director
Saint Louis Mental Health Board


What year did you start working in the philanthropic sector?
  2008

What year did you settle in St. Louis?  2000

How did you get started in philanthropy? 

As Executive Director of St. Louis for Kids (SL4K), the organization received a federal grant to increase capacity of afterschool programs in the region.  Each year of the five -year grant, we were expected to make sub-grants to programs in support of their professional development and quality improvement plans.  This required SL4K to establish criteria for grantee acceptance, development of application and reporting forms, monitoring procedures and other due diligence activities. Developing a process from the ground up was a great learning experience and afforded me the opportunity to understand the reasons behind funding policies and procedures--much more than would have occurred had I been hired directly into an established philanthropic organization. 

What is your favorite part of your job? 

Working with other funders and agencies in collaborative efforts.  It is a great pleasure to be able to strategize with others that share the same goals and are working creatively and diligently to make our human service system more effective and efficient so that our community can become even stronger.

What is the biggest challenge you’ve faced in your job? 

Learning all the rules and procedures required of an independent government organization.  Sunshine laws apply to all our meetings and the services we are allowed to invest in are prescribed by Missouri State Statutes.

What is the most exciting project you’ve worked on in your career in the sector? 

The current Ready By 21 St. Louis cradle to career initiative.  It is regional, comprehensive and, if successful, it will align programs and funders into a much more effective system of care focused on ensuring health and well-being of all our children and youth up to young adulthood.

When I’m not working, I’m…….. 

Playing and singing in an amateur folk group that performs at our church services and functions.

Favorite quote: 

Don’t let the perfect get in the way of the good.

Do you currently serve in a formal role with GCG, or have you in the past?

Board of Directors 2014 – present

Programs & Services Committee 2014

Programs & Services Committee Chair 2015
Jenny Hoelzer
AVP, Community Relations and Grants Manager, Charitable Contributions
Commerce Bank & William T. Kemper Foundation - Commerce Bank, Trustee 
 

What year did you start working in the philanthropic sector
1998

What year did you settle in St. Louis? 
I have lived in St. Louis all of my life.

How did you get started in philanthropy? 
Prior to joining Commerce, I worked briefly for two non-profit organizations, but became interested in corporate community relations as I worked with boards of directors and sponsors. My role at Commerce began in a newly-created position to serve as a liaison between the Community Relations and Marketing departments to link our charitable gifts with special event opportunities. Over the years, the position has grown to include managing our efforts in St. Louis related to charitable event support, finding opportunities for our bankers to get involved on community boards and overseeing our Community Service Committee which identifies volunteer opportunities to engage employees with non-profits.  In 2010 and 2014, I added the role of grants manager for the William T. Kemper Foundation and The Mysun Charitable Foundation, respectively, to my duties.

What is your favorite part of your job? 
Every day is different and I'm never bored!  Developing relationships with both our employees and community leaders has been very rewarding.  It's also great when I can connect one of our bankers with a non-profit for board service or introduce another funder to an organization they may never have encountered.   

What is the biggest challenge you’ve faced in your job? 
Declining requests for support is difficult. There are so many worthwhile charitable organizations in our community and we, unfortunately, are unable to support all of them. 

When I’m not working, I’m…….. 
spending time (usually at sporting events!) with my husband, Denny, and our two children, Michael and Molly.

Favorite quote: 
Throw kindness around like confetti!

Do you currently serve in a formal role with GCG, or have you in the past?
Programs & Services Committee 2014
Engagement Committee 2015


John Fort
Fort Family Foundation

Years in philanthropy? 
12

Years in the St. Louis region? 
50

How did you get started in philanthropy?
Set up a Donor Advised Fund at The Greater St. Louis Community Foundation.

What is your favorite part about your job?
The people.

What is the biggest challenge you've faced in your job?
Making the correct decisions.

What is the most exciting project you've worked on in the past year?
Rebuilding my 1969 Camaro.

When I'm not working I'm....
Spending time with family

Michael Howard
Executive Director
YouthBridge Community Foundation
 
Years in philanthropy? 
5
 
Years in the St. Louis region? 
25
 
How did you get started in philanthropy? 
There’s a song called “Bless the Broken Road” which seems to describe my career path to philanthropy.  I’ve got a very diverse background that includes experience in business development, marketing, wealth management, investments, corporate team leadership, nonprofit management, coaching and teaching.  Although I couldn’t see it at the time, each of those experiences helped prepare me for my current position.   After leaving the corporate world a few years ago and serving as an executive director at a nonprofit agency, I saw how all of my career experiences fit together in the field of philanthropy.  Making that final transition into philanthropy took another 3 years of planning and targeted professional development before getting this wonderful opportunity at YouthBridge.
 
What is your favorite part about your job? 
I love serving as a “bridge” between donors and charities.  We are able to help individuals turn their charitable passions into transformational philanthropy and help charities in the pursuit of their missions.  I get to experience the joy people get from giving and I get to see the outcomes produced by the charities impacted by the gifts.  It truly is a win-win situation. 
 
What is the biggest challenge you've faced in your job? 
First would be staying focused on core competencies.  Second would be allocating limited resources to seemingly endless need.  
 
What is the most exciting project you've worked on in the past year? 
The most exciting project during the past year really involves completing a series of smaller projects as part of the YouthBridge strategic plan.  It’s been very gratifying to see the business model take shape and see the positive outcomes for the community.  
 
When I'm not working I'm....  
Playing basketball, hiking (with my dog Brady), reading, volunteering or just relaxing.  Playing basketball is great exercise and gives me an outlet for the competitive side of my personality!   

 

Debbie Marshall
Vice President, Director of Client and Community Relations
PNC Financial Services, Inc.

Years in philanthropy?
3

Years in the St. Louis region?  
I grew up in the St. Louis area.

How did you get started in philanthropy?
When PNC acquired National City, I became the Director of Client and Community Relations. One of the areas I manage in this role is the charitable aspect of our business.

What is your favorite part about your job?
I enjoy meeting people in the community, building relationships and collaborating with various entities in an effort to strengthen the St. Louis region. The nonprofit world is a relatively new venture for me where I found that I have been able to apply my business strategy and marketing background in working with the nonprofit community.

What is the biggest challenge you've faced in your job?
It’s never fun to turn organizations away. Like every other funder, we have limited resources to work with and strive to have the greatest impact by employing a strategy that supports specific funding priorities.

What is the most exciting project you've worked on in the past year?
We launched a multi-year, collaborative grant around our signature philanthropic effort, PNC Grow Up Great, with the 2010-2011 school year. The grant provides additional in-classroom and experiential learning experiences to preschoolers at Grace Hill Head Start centers.  This school readiness program also engages Maryville University, Operation Food Search, and four cultural partners – Missouri Botanical Gardens, Saint Louis Art Museum, Saint Louis Science Center and St. Louis Symphony.  We are now in the second school year of this program and are seeing positive results, including significant improvement in vocabulary among children, 68% increase in parent engagement, and staff expansion at each of the four cultural partners that includes someone focused on early childhood education programming.

When I'm not working I'm....
I’m training for long-distance runs ranging from 5K to half marathon.  

David Patrick Stiffler
Director of Community Affairs
Equifax

What year did you start working in the philanthropic sector? 
2005

What year did you settle in St. Louis? 
I am from St. Louis and besides a few years in Los Angeles and Austin, I have always lived here.  It’s home.

How did you get started in philanthropy? 
I asked for the job once I started with the company formerly known as TALX.  They had a very robust culture of giving but no clear strategy or a point person for handling the various aspects of corporate giving and volunteer engagement. When Equifax acquired TALX six years ago I continued in my role eventually taking the strategy we started here in St. Louis to corporate HQ in 2014.

What is your favorite part of your job? 
It’s twofold really. Working directly with non-profit clients, particularly as a member of a volunteer team from my company is great especially when you see the immediate impact like in the College Summit summer writing workshops. Those are just transformative experiences and it’s wonderful to share them with coworkers and other friends.  Secondly, working and learning from others in the field.  There are weeks I feel fortunate to ping pong between such people as Faith Sandler, Anne Lowell, Kirby Burkholder, Jane Donahue, Stacy Clay and other friends and professional colleagues who shed light on the pitfalls, twists and turns of philanthropy and community development.

What is the biggest challenge you’ve faced in your job? 
There are a number of internal(to the business unit) as well as external(client facing) challenges but none that I find insurmountable. I guess for me, the challenge is more like a worry, a worry that the course we set our funding and volunteer programs down actually has impact, actually is making a difference no matter how big or small.

What is the most exciting project you’ve worked on in your career in the sector? 
Too hard to just name one.  We helped the very cool Firecracker press expand business operations to Old North and start a charitable wing of their operations.  Faith Sandler and her staff at The Scholarship Foundation helped us start a paid community internship program 4 years ago.  Just being associated with St. Louis Graduates is an honor.  Working closely with the students in the Gephardt Civic Scholar Program.  Too many to list. 

When I’m not working, I’m…….. 
With my amazing wife and son and parents and friends…either cooking, reading or writing…not necessarily in that order.

Favorite quote: 
“The main thing is managed awareness of your role in the world and history.  Think too much and you know you are nothing.  Think just enough and you know you are small, but important to some.  That is the best you can do.” David Eggers

Do you currently serve in a formal role with GCG, or have you in the past?
Board of Directors 2013-2015
Programs & Services Committee 2012-2015



 

Kathleen Feil Reeves
Community Relations Manager
Enterprise Holdings, Inc.


What year did you start working in the philanthropic sector? 
1997

What year did you settle in St. Louis? 
1994

How did you get started in philanthropy? 
During my tenure at Mercantile Bank (now U.S. Bank) I went to work with Dean Keyes doing community development.  Our responsibility was to direct the Bank’s efforts in meeting our community reinvestment act (CRA) requirements.  All of our financial support was provided to agencies addressing affordable housing, small business support and the needs of underserved people.

What is your favorite part of your job? 
Working with people of substance both at Enterprise and in the community.  It has been very rewarding to get to know such great people doing important things and to watch them over time.  I work with amazing people.

What is the biggest challenge you’ve faced in your job? 
My own patience.  

What is the most exciting project you’ve worked on in your career in the sector? 
There isn’t one – all have been a learning experience and combined they have led to a wonderful career.  I am grateful for the opportunities I have had.

When I’m not working, I’m…….. 
cooking and gardening.

Do you currently serve in a formal role with GCG, or have you in the past?
Board of Directors 2006-2011

  • Board of Directors Vice Chair 2009
  • Board of Directors Chair 2010

Engagement Committee Chair 2007-2009


Wendy Jaffe
Executive Director
Trio Foundation of St. Louis

What year did you start working in the philanthropic sector? 
1995

What year did you settle in St. Louis? 
1993

How did you get started in philanthropy? 
As a graduate school candidate at the Brown School of Social Work at Washington University I had an internship (that developed into a full time job) at Jewish Federation of St. Louis.

What is your favorite part of your job? 
It's all about the people, starting with the family members on the board. They are all intelligent, caring individuals who come together as a group to make incredibly thoughtful grants in an effort to improve our community.   I also am inspired by the people who work at the agencies we fund and their dedication to the people they serve. And, of course, there are my colleagues, whose generosity of time and wisdom always amazes me.

What is the biggest challenge you’ve faced in your job? 
Figuring out how to best use my time. I work half-time and find it can be challenging to balance the administrative part of my job with the activities that are more "big picture".

What is the most exciting project you’ve worked on in your career in the sector? 
The Women’s Economic Empowerment Partnership, which we started with the YWCA in 2007. They work with 10 women at a time providing wrap around services (including transportation, child care, medical expenses, and education-related expenses) for low-income single mothers who are pursuing non-traditional career and technical degrees. In 2010 the Trio Foundation of St. Louis was honored with an “Excellence in Grantmaking” award from the Gateway Center for Giving in recognition of our work on this project.

When I’m not working, I’m…….. 
With my son, Adam, and my husband, Neil, often at one of Adam's many sporting events!

Favorite quote: 
If I am not for myself, who will be for me? But if I am only for myself, what am I? If not now, when? –Rabbi Hillel

Do you currently serve in a formal role with GCG, or have you in the past?
Board of Directors 2006-2011

Engagement Committee 2002, 2007, 2014-2015

I was also an employee in the late 1990’s when GCG was named the Metropolitan Association for Philanthropy (MAP).


Cynthia Curry Crim
Foundation Program Manager
Commerce Bank


What year did you start working in the philanthropic sector? 
1999

What year did you settle in St. Louis? 
2002

How did you get started in philanthropy? 
My first job was with the Stearns Family Foundation in Chicago, IL as the Assistant Director.

What is your favorite part of your job? 
Site visits, working with the grantees and learning more about their programs or projects-I see the major part of my job as being a relationship manager, developing relationships, coaching and gaining knowledge about what’s happening to children and families in our region.

What is the biggest challenge you’ve faced in your job? 
Staying abreast of critical changes in our community/region so that our strategic direction and funding opportunities are relevant.

What is the most exciting project you’ve worked on in your career in the sector? 
St. Louis Graduates has been an exciting project for me.

When I’m not working, I’m…….. 
I enjoy my weekend bike rides with my husband, reading, dining out and our family vacations.  

Favorite quote: 

“The journey is valuable but believing in your talents, your abilities and your self-worth can empower you to walk down an even brighter path.”  Soledad O’Brien

Do you currently serve in a formal role with GCG, or have you in the past?
Board of Directors 2007-2013

  • Board of Directors Vice Chair 2010
  • Board of Directors Chair 2011

Programs & Services Committee Chair 2006-2009

Engagement Committee 2009

Governance Committee Chair 2012-2013


Deborah J. Patterson   
President
Monsanto Fund           

What year did you start working in the philanthropic sector? 
1999

What year did you settle in St. Louis? 
Native St. Louisan

How did you get started in philanthropy? 
I was recruited away from my position as Chief Executive Officer of the St. Louis Chapter of the American Red Cross. I met Monsanto leadership during the floods of 1993. The floods of 1993 were devastating to farmers in the Midwest.  Monsanto asked the St. Louis Chapter to develop a disaster relief program focused on rural communities. Monsanto and its competitors raised more than $5M for this effort. When the disaster was over, I requested from Monsanto’s CEO to have a Monsanto Executive to serve on the board of the Red Cross. He secured the Senior Vice President for Human Resources to serve on the board. She recruited me away from the Red Cross.

What is your favorite part of your job? 
The best part of my job is that it enables me to be in service to others. While being in service to others I get to do things that I think I'm really good at e.g. communication, teaching, and program development. I use my communication skills to enroll our people and the community in the Monsanto Fund vision and goals. I love program development, working with corporate affairs staff around the world and their non-profit partners we've developed several "signature programs". Finally, I get a chance to use my teaching skills through providing technical assistance to prospective partners.             

What is the biggest challenge you’ve faced in your job? 
The biggest challenge I faced in my job was taking the Monsanto Fund global. For decades most of our grant making was headquarters focused while more and more of our people and our businesses were outside St. Louis.

It is a tough and continues to be a tough balancing act to do enough in the headquarters community to preserve your reputation as a good corporate citizen while trying to meet the demands of other communities within a budget that isn’t growing at the same pace as the demands.

What is the most exciting project you’ve worked on in your career in the sector? 
In 2010 we launched the America’s Farmers Grow Community program which gives farmers a chance to win an opportunity for us the Monsanto Fund to make a $2,500 donation to a local charity of their choice.  The program was so successful we subsequently launched two additional programs on our America’s Farmers Grow platform; Grow Rural Education and Grow Rural Leaders.  Grow Rural Education which gives rural school districts a chance to apply for a grant of up to $25,000 to improve math and science.  In the fall of 2014 we launched Grow Ag leaders, $1,500 scholarship program for high school and college students interested in majoring in agriculture or agriculture related fields.  Over 500 scholarships will be awarded in 2015.  Last year we had close to 85,000 farmers participate in multiple America’s Farmers Program. 

When I’m not working, I’m…….. 
I'm reading! I love mysteries, historical fiction, and books that are beautifully written. …books where I experience a range of emotions. I've grown in my love of the written word which has led me to re-read the classics.

Favorite quote: 
“The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others” – Mahatma Gandhi

Do you currently serve in a formal role with GCG, or have you in the past?
No.

    


JoAnn Hejna   
Executive Director
The Saigh Foundation  

Years in philanthropy? 
11 years with the foundation, 44 years with Fred Saigh. Total 55 years!

Years in the St. Louis region? 
All of my life

How did you get started in philanthropy?
On my 24th birthday I was hired by Fred Saigh to chart his stocks and bonds and to handle his personal philanthrophy.  I learned a great deal about investments but I learned much more about philanthrophy.  Fred was very generous with community needs, hospital equipment, university scholarships, and special funds.  However, more than half of his giving was done anonymously for strangers who needed clothing, individual tuition, shoes, braces, medical bills to be paid.  All of this was done from the heart with no tax incentives.  He was a rare individual who gave much and expected nothing.

What is your favorite part about your job?     
Absolutely everything.  I am so happy to have the opportunity to continue Fred's legacy and serve the St. Louis community.  There is no way to describe a child's face when given new clothes, a hearing aid, a first-time camp experience, or disadvantaged youths learning they can have a scholarship to college, or a parent's joy for their preemie who lives because of new technology.  Giving is the greatest feeling in the world and making a difference is a wonderful reward.         

What is the biggest challenge you've faced in your job? 
It is hard to deny a grant because there is just a certain amount to go around.  All of our requests are from organizations doing fine work in the community, but we must prioritize to ensure maximum allocation where it is needed.  Hopefully, the economy will improve and we all will have more to distribute.   

What is the most exciting project you've worked on in the past year?    
All of our projects are exciting.  One that stands out, however, is Children's Hospital Pediatric Simulation Center. which is an invaluable learning tool for teaching staff and parents how to effectively care for an ill child.

When I'm not working I'm....
Spending time with my six sons, one daughter, their spouses, 19 grandchildren and 8 great-grandchildren.  Almost all of them live in the area so we have many family activities.  My children grew up with Fred Saigh and they are very interested in the Foundation and I try to keep them updated on Foundation projects.

Debbie A. Schirmer

Community Affairs Manager
Maritz

Years in philanthropy? 
23

Years in the St. Louis region? 
Lifelong

How did you get started in philanthropy? 
Twenty-three years ago, I was hired by the Senior Vice President of Corporate Communications to help manage and administer Maritz’ philanthropic efforts and activities.  Through the years, my role has evolved with progressive responsibilities from managing charitable contributions to designing and executing a strategic community involvement approach that ensures the overall corporate giving program achieves maximum community impact and aligns with company values and business strategy.   

What is your favorite part about your job? 
My favorite part about my job is the opportunity to engage and collaborate with non-profits and discuss ways we can mutually work together for the greater good of our focused area of giving – for Maritz, that is philanthropic initiatives and partnerships with organizations offering programs designed to educate. 

What is the biggest challenge you’ve faced in your job? 
The biggest challenge I faced was two years ago when our company determined it was time to establish a philanthropic program that was better integrated with the company’s business strategy – essentially, narrowing the focus of our giving, which at that time spanned the gamut, to one that could  provide a meaningful impact on a key community issue; align with business needs and objectives; position Maritz to utilize all of its investment resources effectively; and encourage corporate-wide involvement.  A tall task; however, with the help a strategic planning team comprised of employee representatives from across the company, we were able to narrow the focus to education, thereby giving us the foundation to build upon. 

What is the most exciting project you’ve worked on in the past year? 
One of the outcomes of becoming more focused in our giving at Maritz was the realization for the need of a robust employee volunteer program.  In recent months, I have been researching best practices on employee community engagement and developing an approach best suited for Maritz, drawing from the strengths of its employees and skill sets.  I’m excited to see what the future holds for us and proud to play a role in this important initiative. 

When I’m Not working I’m …
When I’m not working, you’ll find me enjoying time with my family – two grown children - son Chad in San Francisco, and daughter Hope and her husband, James, who reside nearby.  I enjoy the arts, music in particular, and also like taking photos.  I direct chancel choirs for two churches with rehearsals two nights during the week plus worship services on Sunday.  

Sarah Kramer
Director of Community Relations
Peabody

What year did you start working in the philanthropic sector? 

2004 

What year did you settle in St. Louis? 
I moved here in 2001, but have left twice for job offers in Chicago and near Boston. However, I keep coming back. St. Louis will do that to a person.

How did you get started in philanthropy? 
I “fell into philanthropy” while working at Mallinckrodt / Tyco Healthcare, and eventually Covidien. An opening occurred in the organization, and I was selected to take the helm. What a fortuitous gift! My passion for volunteering and nonprofit committee work combined with my background in all endeavors of communications parlayed nicely into a career as a giving officer. After launching various programs at Covidien, I was moved to the East Coast to run their global philanthropy efforts. My heart belonged back in St. Louis, however. So I joined Pfizer’s St. Louis team and once again worked philanthropy at the St. Louis level. Now I’m at Peabody Energy, managing a Community Relations Department that’s responsible for charitable giving into the St. Louis region, our headquarters employee outreach efforts, and miscellaneous projects like United Way fundraising.

What is your favorite part of your job? 
I absolutely love two things: bringing new ideas to the table and connecting people. My sweet spot is helping corporations to evolve their community relations efforts to more than just cutting a check … it’s about employee involvement, volunteerism, diversity initiatives, senior management involvement, collaborative efforts and connecting people for long-time or life-time relationships. I’ve also been lucky in my “free time” to volunteer for various boards, and it is a thrill to really dig in and help organizations with capacity building efforts; it’s almost like a second job, and it’s a whole new way of getting to know an organization, refine my strategic and creative thinking skills, and understand the regional landscape.

What is the biggest challenge you’ve faced in your job? 
Finding a focus. Meaning, big companies get approached by innumerable organizations and by their own employees with all sorts of donation requests. Setting the parameters for funding is difficult, because we literally want to help as much as we possibly can. That being said, “fit” is important … we know that we can provide better, more sustainable support if we partner with those organizations that truly fit within our core focus areas. But getting to the point of establishing and sticking to these focus areas is quite challenging, especially for a global company going through tremendous market pressures and transition.     

What is the most exciting project you’ve worked on in your career in the sector? 
It was a thrill and challenge to assist Covidien in establishing their giving focus areas, their grant application process and their core national nonprofit partners.

When I’m not working, I’m…….. 
Incredibly blessed.  I’m a superwoman and supermom to three kids, four and under, which is incredibly trying and beautiful, all at the same time.  I’m a wife to a creative visionary and Renaissance man who will not stop working on house projects.  I’m a church-goer and proudly share my faith.  And I’m a community volunteer, currently serving on the boards of Food Outreach, Focus St. Louis and The Lutheran Foundation. I don’t sit down much, like ever! I love being outdoors, and our family utilizes St. Louis’ amazing cultural amenities whenever we can.

Favorite quote: 
Stop focusing on how stressed you are, and focus on how blessed you are.

Do you currently serve in a formal role with GCG, or have you in the past?
No.


Melinda McAliney

‚ÄčProgram Director
Lutheran Foundation of St. Louis


What year did you start working in the philanthropic sector?  

 1993

What year did you settle in St. Louis?  

1991

How did you get started in philanthropy? 
My first job right out of graduate school was at United Way of Greater St. Louis, in what was then called the Allocations Department.  It was an excellent way to learn about the St. Louis region and how to do philanthropy effectively and with compassion.  I still draw on my training and experiences there in my work today.                

What is your favorite part of your job? 
I love to learn and look at the community at a macro level.  Working at a Foundation, I get to learn new things every day, especially about what area organizations and congregations are doing to strengthen our community and how their individual efforts affect the larger picture.  Learning about their hopes and dreams and ways in which Lutheran Foundation could partner with them is both exciting and humbling.

What is the biggest challenge you’ve faced in your job? 
I think it is always a challenge to decline a request.  Even if the ask isn't a good fit with the Foundation's interests or it is not clearly outlined, it is still someone's passion and good intentions.  Telling them we are not choosing to invest in this passion is always a hard message to give.  I always try to provide constructive feedback so that they may be more effective when approaching other funders.         

What is the most exciting project you’ve worked on in your career in the sector? 
I have been fortunate to work on many exciting projects throughout my career.  I think my favorite one has been to help design and build Send Me St. Louis, which provides capacity-building support to area churches and organizations around providing effective services and equipping volunteers.

When I’m not working, I’m…….. 
The mother of two young kids and wife to a wonderful husband, all of who keep me very busy.  We mostly hibernate in the winter months but spend the summer on our boat and hanging out with friends.  I fill up the few remaining minutes I have volunteering in the community.

Favorite quote: 
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.—Margaret Mead

Do you currently serve in a formal role with GCG, or have you in the past?
Programs & Services Committee 2010-2015

  • Programs & Services Committee Chair 2014


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